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By Stephen A. Solomon, D.M.D. & Jonathan A. Solomon, D.M.D
March 18, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures

Although regular brushing will help keep your teeth healthy, for many people brushing alone doesn't give them the dazzling smile they are hoping for. If your teeth are stained or discolored, professional whitening services can help. Dr. Stephen Solomon and Dr. Jonathan Solomon offer teeth whitening in Putnam, CT.

Who Needs Whitening?

The color of teeth can vary from one person to the next. Habits such as smoking or consuming certain foods and drinks like coffee can stain your teeth. Teeth whitening in Putnam, CT, is available for individuals who would like to improve the color and overall appearance of their teeth.

How Is Whitening Done?

In-office teeth whitening is done using a specialized peroxide formula. Your dentist will make sure your gums are protected before applying the whitening gel. It is then activated with a special light and left on your teeth for about an hour. Your teeth can be 3-8 shades whiter with just one treatment and the results are long-lasting with the proper dental hygiene. 

Is Whitening Safe?

Whitening is safe for most patients. The dentist will decide if you are a good candidate for this procedure because there are some types of discoloration that don't respond to whitening like discoloration caused by certain medications. There are other treatment options for these kinds of stains.

Care For Your Teeth

Once you have completed your whitening procedure, you will want to care for your teeth going forward. You will want to make sure that you kick bad habits which are contributing to your teeth staining. You should also brush your teeth twice a day and floss at least once a day.

If you would like to learn more about brightening your smile, Dr. Stephen Solomon, and Dr. Jonathan Solomon offers teeth whitening in Putnam, CT. Call (860) 928-6533 to set up an appointment today.

By Stephen A. Solomon, D.M.D. & Jonathan A. Solomon, D.M.D
February 04, 2022
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: dental crowns  

Are you suffering from a weak, damaged tooth? You can now strengthen your teeth and improve your smile with dental crowns from your Putnam, CT, dentists, Dr. Stephen Solomon and Dr. Jonathan Solomon.

Dental problems, like teeth decay, will affect your smile and make the teeth unable to function well. For such cases, dental crowns are the solution. A dental crown is a tooth-shaped cap that fits over your damaged, decayed, or misshapen tooth. As it replaces the whole tooth structure above the gum line, the crown is the treatment of choice when the damaged tooth is missing a significant amount of its structure.

Dental crowns in Putnam, CT, can be made from different materials. The choice depends on the personal preferences of the patients and the qualities that must be present in the crown to perform its function. Porcelain crowns look like natural teeth, which makes them the most aesthetic choice. Cast gold crowns are the best for durability, but they aren't preferred in the front teeth because of their color. Another option is porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns, which also have their pros and cons.

To prepare your tooth for the crown, your dentist will shape your tooth to fit inside it. After they prepared the tooth, your dentist will take an impression of your tooth and send it to the laboratory to produce a custom-made crown for you. When it is ready, your dentist will cement the crown into place. A crown can be fixed using either a resin or permanent cement.

A dental crown can be used to restore a broken tooth, hold dental bridges in place, cover a misshapen or discolored tooth, and cover a dental implant. As a bonus, the crowns don’t require any special care other than the daily routine of brushing and flossing.

To learn more about dental crowns, contact your Putnam, CT, dentists, Dr. Stephen Solomon and Dr. Jonathan Solomon. Call (860) 928-6533 to schedule your appointment.

By Stephen A. Solomon, D.M.D. & Jonathan A. Solomon, D.M.D
January 16, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   veneers  
HowMLBStarAaronJudgeChangedHisSmileandHowYouCanToo

Between the final game of the World Series in late October and spring training in February, major league baseball players work on their skills preparing for the new season. Reporters on a Zoom call to the New York Yankees' training camp wanted to know what star outfielder Aaron Judge had been doing along those lines. But when he smiled, their interest turned elsewhere: What had Aaron Judge done to his teeth?

Already with 120 homers after only five seasons, Judge is a top player with the Yankees. His smile, however, has been less than spectacular. Besides a noticeable gap between his top front teeth (which were also more prominent than the rest of his teeth), Judge also had a chipped tooth injury on a batting helmet in 2017 during a home plate celebration for a fellow player's walk-off home run.

But now Judge's teeth look even, with no chip and no gap. So, what did the Yankee slugger have done?

He hasn't quite said, but it looks as though he received a “smile makeover” with porcelain veneers, one of the best ways to turn dental “ugly ducklings” into “beautiful swans.” And what's even better is that veneers aren't limited to superstar athletes or performers—if you have teeth with a few moderate dental flaws, veneers could also change your smile.

As the name implies, veneers are thin shells of porcelain bonded to the front of teeth to mask chips, cracks, discolorations or slight gaps between teeth. They may even help even out disproportionately sized teeth. Veneers are custom-made by dental technicians based on a patient's particular tooth dimensions and color.

Like other cosmetic techniques, veneers are a blend of technology and artistry. They're made of a durable form of dental porcelain that can withstand biting forces (within reason, though—you'd want to avoid biting down on ice or a hard piece of food with veneered teeth). They're also carefully colored so that they blend seamlessly with your other teeth. With the right artistic touch, we can make them look as natural as possible.

Although porcelain veneers can accommodate a wide range of dental defects, they may not be suitable for more severe flaws. After examining your teeth, we'll let you know if you're a good candidate for veneers or if you should consider another restoration. Chances are, though, veneers could be your way to achieve what Aaron Judge did—a home run smile.

If you would like more information about porcelain veneers, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty As Never Before.”

By Stephen A. Solomon, D.M.D. & Jonathan A. Solomon, D.M.D
January 06, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
TheFirstStepToBeatingGumDiseaseIsUnderstandingHowItStarts

If you're over thirty, you have a fifty-fifty chance of contracting gum disease and your odds worsen as you get older. But your fate isn't sealed, especially if you know what to do to prevent this harmful disease.

But before we discuss your prevention strategy, let's look first at oral bacteria, the basic cause for gum disease. Although most bacterial strains in your mouth are benign or even beneficial, a few can infect your gums. And, the more of them there are in your mouth, the higher your risk for infection.

These bacteria multiply with the help of a sticky biofilm called dental plaque, providing them a ready source of food and shelter. Plaque and its hardened form tartar accumulate daily on dental surfaces, particularly if you don't practice daily brushing and flossing.

Once a gum infection begins, the body unleashes an inflammatory response to isolate the infected tissues from healthy ones. As a result, the gums can become swollen and reddened, and may easily bleed. If you see signs like these, you should seek treatment as soon as possible to stop the infection's advance.

And, advance it will, spreading ever deeper into the gums until it threatens the supporting bone. At this point, with the gums becoming detached from the teeth and the bone compromised, the affected teeth could be in imminent danger of loss.

These basic disease processes underscore the importance of one thing—the daily removal of bacterial plaque through brushing and flossing. The bacteria that cause disease don't thrive well in an environment devoid of plaque.

But even if you're diligent about your hygiene, you may still miss some plaque; this can then calcify into tartar, which is likely impossible to remove with brushing and flossing. That's why you need dental cleanings at least every six months to remove stubborn tartar and any lingering plaque.

Regular dental visits also increase your chances of early gum disease detection. The earlier we're able to diagnose and start treating an infection, the better the outcome.

Gum disease can begin and advance quickly, sometimes without you noticing. But daily brushing and flossing, regular dental cleanings and prompt attention at the first sign of trouble can help you stay ahead of this harmful disease.

If you would like more information on preventing gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Gum Disease Gets Started.”

By Stephen A. Solomon, D.M.D. & Jonathan A. Solomon, D.M.D
December 27, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
DentalCleaningsTakeonNewImportanceAfterGumDisease

There are few things sweeter to hear than for your dentist to tell you your periodontal (gum) disease is under control. Depending on how deep the infection may have advanced, your treatment journey may have been a long one.

Unfortunately, while the battle may be over, the threat still lingers—once you've experienced a gum infection, you're at higher risk for a recurrence. To minimize that risk, you may need to undergo dental cleanings on a more frequent basis than before.

The average patient typically sees their dentist for cleanings every six months. The aim of these visits is to remove dental plaque, a thin film of bacterial-laden particles that is the prime source for gum disease. These cleanings are meant to supplement a daily habit of brushing and flossing, which should remove the bulk of plaque that builds up throughout the day.

After gum disease treatment, though, you may need to have these cleanings more frequently, and of a more involved nature than the normal cleaning. For patients who've overcome advanced gum disease, that frequency could initially be every other week, every couple of months or every three months. This frequency may change depending on the status of your gum health.

Besides a thorough cleaning, a specialized periodontal maintenance visit may include other interventions. For example, your dentist may apply topical antibiotics or other anti-bacterial products to keep bacterial growth under control.

Protecting you from further gum infection isn't totally on your dentist's shoulders—you also have a role to play. You'll need to brush and floss your teeth thoroughly every day, along with using any other hygiene products prescribed or recommended by your dentist. Daily hygiene will help prevent the buildup of dental plaque and subsequent bacterial growth.

You'll also need to keep a watchful eye on your gums for any emerging signs of infection. If you begin to notice swelling, pain or bleeding, contact your dentist as soon as possible to initiate remedial treatment.

Gum disease treatment can bring your gums back to a reasonable state of good health. But that state could be reversed with a returning gum infection. Only vigilance practiced by both you and your dentist can stop that from happening.

If you would like more information on post-gum disease dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.





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